Pickled Geese

Pickled Geese

I was so excited for the Colonial Revival Quilt Study! Immediately, I began to search for “my” inspirational quilt. I knew instantly when I stumbled upon it! It was love at first sight! With inspirational quilt selected and secured, next I began one of my most arduous and intimidating quilting challenges. I spent a few months (to be honest, a year) “fretting” over drafting, designing, and constructing the elements of the Pickle Dish pattern. In my mind, I knew exactly what I wanted, but I just wasn’t sure how to create it. I studied every Pickle Dish and Double Wedding Ring quilt and pattern I could find. I did endless searches on the web. I purchased and read books about Pickle Dishes and Wedding Rings (many of which were out of print). I designed and redrafted a myriad Pickle Dish patterns. I started sewing two different variations of these patterns. Some might say, I was “obsessed,” but I’m a counselor in my real life. I know the difference between “fretting” and “obsessing.”

I was amazed at the number of design decisions critical in creating a Pickle Dish. During this grueling process, I debated the angles of the arcs, the width of the arcs, the length of the arcs, the number of pickles in the arcs, the angles of the pickles in the arcs, the intersections of the arcs, and even the visual impact of squares versus kite shaped pieces in the intersections. I even pondered if the arcs and intersections should form circles that were circular, or circles with flat tops, sides, and bottoms. Now remember . . . this is still just “fretting” NOT “obsessing.”

Finally, after a year of researching, redesigning, multiple stops and starts, and perhaps even a little procrastinating; I returned to “my” inspirational quilt and drafted it – exactly! I discovered in this challenging, yet enlightening process that I couldn’t find or create an arc, a circle, or even a pickle that I liked more than the quilt I fell in love with a year earlier.

So, did I put a little of me in this challenge quilt? Yes! You may not be able to see all the time spent designing, planning, and rethinking this challenge. But you will see the geese flying in a few circles, and the metallic fabrics that give new life and sparkle to the original 1930’s color palette.