Civil War Sampler

Civil War Sampler

I used the Jane Blakely Stickle Quilt as my inspiration quilt. When my parents saw the Stickle quilt at the Bennington Vermont Museum they both thought the quilt magnificent! I then purchased Dear Jane: The Two Hundred Twenty-five Patterns from the 1863 Jane A. Stickle Quilt by Brenda Manges Papadakis. Brenda says that Jane was born on April 8, 1817, the daughter of Erastus Blakely and Sarah Rein. “Jane’s marriage to Walter A. Stickle is presumed from the census of 1850 … It does not appear that Jane and Walter had children of their own.” Brenda does not mention if Walter served in the Civil War. He was not included on a list of Vermont Civil War veterans.

I have been collecting Civil War reproduction fabrics forever. My original plan was to make the quilt a true sampler, with no repeated fabric or pattern. But it just became too much fun hand stitching the blocks using the same pattern in the different color ways! I did use several patterns from the Stickle quilt and several Carol Doak paper foundation patterns. I drafted many of the patterns. Some of the fabric lines I used were: Metropolitan Fair, Conestoga, Charleston, Jo’s Calicos, Civil War Crossings, Sturbridge Village, Along the Fence, Lancaster, Anna’s Starry Night, Fredericksburg, Carriage House, 1840 Birds and Basics, Gingham Rose, and Material Pleasures.

For my study quilt I have incorporated many double pink fabrics. The barn raising setting appealed to me. I started with a double pink in the center. The following rows were stitched with beige, blue, pink, and green fabrics. I ended the corner sections with beiges and finished with double pink corners. The double pink diamond row in the center of the quilt just sparkles. The backing is a Judie Rothermel Charleston fabric.

I feel I have a connection with Jane. Her maiden name was Blakely. My father’s mother’s maiden name was Bleakly. So there could be a possibility that, somewhere in the past, someone switched the “e” between Bleakly and Blakely. And I have always felt that Judie Rothermel’s husband and I could be cousins. And my great-great-grandmother’s middle name was Rothermel. So I consider Judie to be a cousin.