Tours

Frontier Culture Museum & Augusta County Historical Society

Thursday, September 10, 2020
7:45 a.m. to 4:40 p.m.
Cost: $65
Min: 35 Max: 50
Lunch on own at nearby restaurant of choice in historic downtown Staunton, VA.

To begin with, he program will be a guided tour of The Frontier Culture Museum, a Living History Museum, and a Valley focused quilt turning in the Lecture Hall where quilts from the museum collection will be on display.  The guided tour will include demonstrations of weaving on an Irish farm, flax processing in the 1740’s, and spinning in the 1820’s. 

Next, we will visit the R. R. Smith Center for History and Art, home of the Augusta Co. Historical Society in downtown Staunton. An introduction to the Queen City of Staunton will be presented by Charles “Rick” Chittum, Independent Research Scholar and collector of Augusta County Decorative Arts, followed by a quilt turning and opportunity to explore the center’s exhibitions.

 

Fort Harrison

Thursday September 10, 2020
8:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. or 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Cost: $50
Min: 35 Max: 50

Fort Harrison, the home of Daniel Harrison was built of native limestone around 1749, just prior to the French and Indian War. It is among the earliest surviving houses in the Shenandoah Valley. This house museum is furnished with appropriate, locally made decorative arts. The museum’s textile collection will be on view for the tour including a stuffed and corded white-work quilt by Mary Stuart Harrison made for her husband Dr. Peachy Harrison around 1804. It features large script letters P and H.  Daniel Harrison's cash crops of flax and hemp make these fibers of special interest at the site. A weaving demonstration on the museum’s circa 1860 four-harness loom and displays of flax processing tools will be available.

Walking and stairs are required for this tour.

Museum of the Shenandoah Valle (MSV) and Cherry Row (Jenny Powers Home)

Thursday, September 10, 2020
8:15 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Cost: $80
Min: 35 Max: 50
Lunch included with tour

The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley endeavors to preserve and enrich the cultural life and heritage of the Valley. Located on the largest green space in the city of Winchester, the MSV is a regional history complex including a 50,000 sq. ft. museum designed by Michael Graves, seven acres of formal gardens, and the Glen Burnie House built ca. 1794. A quilt turning of the museum’s collection will be featured along with an opportunity to explore the museum and the grounds on your own.

The tour will also visit historic Cherry Row, lovingly restored by Jenny Powers and her late husband David. Finished in 1794 by Quakers David and Mary Lupton, it is one of the earliest examples of Federal architec­ture in Frederick County. Jenny will share her collection of locally made quilts, samplers, and coverlets. 

Abrams Delight-Winchester-Fredrick County Historical Society and Belle Grove Plantation

Friday, September 11, 2020
7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Cost: $80
Min: 35 Max: 50
Lunch included with tour

Abram's Delight, built in 1754 by Abraham Hollingsworth, is the oldest surviving house in Winchester, Virginia. It served as the area’s first Quaker meetinghouse and remained in the Hollingsworth family for 200 years. The tour will include a quilt turning and opportunity to explore the house and its regional furniture and art.

Belle Grove represents one of the outstanding historic mansions of the Shenandoah Valley. It was built of native limestone in 1797 by Major Isaac Hite Jr. and his wife Nellie Madison Hite, sister of President James Madison. At one time the plantation contained 7,500 acres. The manor house and grounds are now owned by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and operated by Belle Grove, Inc. The house has been restored and furnished to reflect the 1815-1830 time period. In the Manor House will be mid-19th century quilts from the Belle Grove collection as well as a local Valley family quilt collection that date between 1840 and 1890. In addition to touring the house, a selection of Shenandoah County quilts sponsored by the Shenandoah County Historical Society will be shared by local collectors in the Beverley B. Shoemaker Welcome Center, the property’s restored 1918 barn.  Belle Grove quilts will be displayed in the Manor House and the Unger collection of local quilts will be on display in the lower lever of the Manor House.

The Heritage Museum, Harrisonburg-Rockingham Historical Society

Friday, September 11, 2020
8:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. or 12:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Cost: $50
Min: 35 Max: 50

The Heritage Museum, home of the Harrisonburg-Rockingham Historical Society is located in Dayton, VA. The site features an extensive genealogy and local history research library, an outstanding exhibition presenting the history of the Rockingham County and Harrisonburg area, and an important collection of Shenandoah Valley folk and decorative arts. The tour will feature a quilt turning from the museum’s collection of locally made quilts.  Tour the museum on your own.

Crossroads: Valley-Brethren and Mennonite Heritage Center

Friday, September 11, 2020
8:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. or 12:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Cost: $50
Min: 35 Max: 50

The Valley-Brethren and Mennonite Heritage Center is a 23-acre Shenandoah Valley homestead including a welcome center, 1854 brick house and dependencies, 1829 log house, etc. The site interprets the beliefs and lifestyles of the local Brethren and Mennonite people through stories, photos, anecdotes, and artifacts. The tour includes a special quilt turning.

The Sites House

Sunday September 13, 2020
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Cost: $25
Max: 50

Walking and stairs are involved on this tour.

Requires individual transportation or arrange carpooling on Seminar Information Board. Travel time 20-30 minutes from Hotel Madison 

The Sites House is the private residence of Beverley A. and Jeffrey S. Evans. The German center-chimney limestone house is located near Broadway, VA in the heart of the Shenandoah Valley. It was built around 1810 by the Sites family who migrated from Pennsylvania down the Great Wagon Road in the 1780s. Jeff and Beverley began the sympathetic restoration of the Sites House in 1987 and finished the project in 1991. The house had not been lived in since 1954 and had never been fitted with modern conveniences. Beverley Evans oversaw the restoration and received several awards for the completed project. The Sites House is on both the National and Virginia Registers of Historic Places, and has been featured in Early American Life magazine and at the Colonial Williamsburg Antiques Forum

The home is furnished with 18th and 19th century Shenandoah Valley furniture and decorative arts which is one of the finest and most extensive private collections of its type. The Evans quilt collection will be featured at the AQSG opening reception on Thursday evening, September 10.