Baskets in the Garden

Baskets in the Garden

I chose this basket quilt for the 2016 Quilt Study because I love the unusual and quirky design. I wondered why the baskets were appliquéd in such a random way and if the little appliqué pieces in the borders were trees, mushrooms, or flowers.

This quilt has a Pennsylvania origin so I began searching through books on Pennsylvania quilts and Pennsylvania folk art designs and Fraktur motifs. While I could not find another quilt with similar appliqué pieces, pictures of hand-drawn Frakturs showed stylized flower designs which could have inspired the appliquéd pieces in the borders.

The workmanship on the quilt is crude and done by hand. It is interesting that no short cuts were taken – standard templates were not used and each basket and flower was cut individually in a free-style fashion. Perhaps this was a first quilt or a quilt made by a young girl. All of these elements make for a most charming quilt.

My study quilt was constructed similar to the original quilt as I wanted to capture the unique nature of the original quilt. Appliqué and quilting was done by hand; however, I did the piecing by machine. Each basket and flower was individually created and then appliquéd in a random manner.

While the original quilt maker had a flair for creating inventive designs, I found this to be a difficult process to duplicate. Creating unique basket shapes and flowers required I set aside my years of learned structure of upright baskets and recognizable flower designs.

My inspiration quilt shows signs of wear and washing yet it continues to be in very good condition and well loved. It was exciting to find a quilt that appears to be an original creation, made without regard to the standards of perfection common today.I chose this basket quilt for the 2016 Quilt Study because I love the unusual and quirky design. I wondered why the baskets were appliquéd in such a random way and if the little appliqué pieces in the borders were trees, mushrooms, or flowers.

This quilt has a Pennsylvania origin so I began searching through books on Pennsylvania quilts and Pennsylvania folk art designs and Fraktur motifs. While I could not find another quilt with similar appliqué pieces, pictures of hand-drawn Frakturs showed stylized flower designs which could have inspired the appliquéd pieces in the borders.

The workmanship on the quilt is crude and done by hand. It is interesting that no short cuts were taken – standard templates were not used and each basket and flower was cut individually in a free-style fashion. Perhaps this was a first quilt or a quilt made by a young girl. All of these elements make for a most charming quilt.

My study quilt was constructed similar to the original quilt as I wanted to capture the unique nature of the original quilt. Appliqué and quilting was done by hand; however, I did the piecing by machine. Each basket and flower was individually created and then appliquéd in a random manner.

While the original quilt maker had a flair for creating inventive designs, I found this to be a difficult process to duplicate. Creating unique basket shapes and flowers required I set aside my years of learned structure of upright baskets and recognizable flower designs.

My inspiration quilt shows signs of wear and washing yet it continues to be in very good condition and well loved. It was exciting to find a quilt that appears to be an original creation, made without regard to the standards of perfection common today.