Study Centers

Study Centers are Optional Events and are an additional $50 apiece

Thursday Morning Study Centers

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

The Apple Pie Ridge Star
with Mary Robare

The focus of this Study Center is an appliqué quilt block pattern known by some as the “Apple Pie Ridge Star.” The pattern’s first documented appearance on an American quilt occurs on a Baltimore quilt dated 1844. To date, this Study Center’s researcher has recorded fifty examples on quilts dated 1844-1900. Interestingly, mapping of these examples through space and time tantalizingly mimics routes of mid-nineteenth-century migration, and offers context for understanding historical quilts. Additionally, while learning about some of the people and communities who made and inscribed quilts with “Apple Pie Ridge Stars,” we will consider how the pattern may have evolved, been shared, and received one of its most charming names.

Robare APRS AQSG

Hollingsworth Family Quilt, d. 1858
Collection of the Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society

RobareWFCHS

Forever Paisley
with Carol Butzke

 

Have you ever wondered about the exotic paisley design? This Study Center will focus on the origin and evolution of the buta/paisley design through the ages with a power point presentation, lecture, and quilt/shawl turning. Participants are invited to bring an example of paisley in a quilt, shawl, or garment to be shared.

Using Genealogy to Find Your Quilt’s Origin
with Becky Thompson

 

You have a quilt that your grandmother said was made by her aunt. You have questions! Which aunt? Where did she live? Was she married? Where did her husband work? Does the age of the quilt match the adult years of this unknown great-great-aunt? This Study Center will show you how to create a family tree using Ancestry.com to discover the details of the quiltmaker’s life, including census data, newspaper articles, marriage records, etc.

Thursday Afternoon Study Centers

2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

What Should I Do With My Quilts? A Look at the Future of Your Collection
with Sharon Pinka

 

Take a look at the different options available for downsizing your collection of antique/vintage quilts, fabric, notions, and ephemera via shop/online retailing, auctions, tag sales, and donations/gifting. Find out where, when, and how you can make it happen with the least amount of stress. Hands-on analysis of various vintage items to help decide who/what should be the next custodian of your treasures!

Repairing Old Quilts
with Claire McKarns

 

Do you have quilts in your family or collection that have suffered from washing, wear, or use through the years? This Study Center is designed to help you bring those sentimental or historic pieces back to life for display or function. Various methods will be discussed or demonstrated to assist you in those efforts. You are welcome to bring a quilt or top to the Study Center for ideas on revitalizing it.

CANCELLED
Selections from The Baltimore Museum of Art Quilt Collection
with Anita Jones

 

 

Friday Morning Study Centers

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Tiny Treasures-Two Hundred Years of Doll Quilts
with Lenna DeMarco

 

Nearly everyone is enamored of these diminutive textiles. Over the centuries they have been made by both young girls and grown women. We will explore how doll quilts reflect the evolving roles and expectations of girls and women in the American culture. From the restrictive domestic life of the early 19th century to the freedom and independence of the late 20th century, who made doll quilts and why has dramatically changed. We will closely examine numerous examples of doll quilts spanning 200 years to find just what each quilt can tell us. Participants are asked to bring examples from their own collections. Key points and a bibliography will be provided.

Who Are These People? Researching Names on Name Inscribed Quilts
with Cindy Stuart

 

“Name Inscribed” quilts include fundraiser, friendship and signed quilts. Do these name inscribed quilts hold a fascination for you? Do you wonder where they originated and who all these people were? If you want to learn efficient techniques for answering these questions, then this is the Study Center for you. We’ll cover how to go about organizing the names to aid your research. We’ll discuss the use of free online resources, compare these with ones that charge fees, and talk about problems associated with these resources. Learn how to research ways to identify family relationships between the names. The presenter will share tips and tricks learned after doing genealogy research on over 2,000 quilt names. There will be an opportunity to view friendship and fundraiser quilts from the presenter’s collection, and participants are encouraged to bring a quilt to share.

Masterpieces of the Early Twentieth Century
with Polly Mello

 

A lecture and trunk show of stunning, rare, and beautiful quilts designed in the great quilt revival of the early 20th Century. This designer driven revival changed the course of quilting for the next 40 years and beyond. You will see quilts designed by Marie Webster, Ruby McKim, Anne Orr, Rose Kretsigner, Huber Ver Mehren, and more. You will come away with a new outlook on early 20th Century quilts. Prepare to be amazed!

Friday Afternoon Study Centers

2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

The Language of Redwork
with Meta Van Nostram

 

Redwork is an amazing record of trends and the culture of a time and place. The textiles and images of outline embroidery are an important record of the quiltmaker’s thoughts and purposes for making this expressive form. Participants will experience a walk through time in red and white, and sometimes blue, pink, green, yellow, lavender or brown, and examine Redwork quilts and textile items to share and discuss why this form of art needlework became a fad and continues to transform. Redwork has a voice. The session will end with input of ideas for the next modern phase or fad for outline Redwork.

Managing and Planning for Private Collections
with Alden O’Brien, Newbold Richardson, Debby Cooney, and Alison Polivka

 

There comes a point in the life of all collectors, serious or casual, when decisions need to be made about proper storage, care and dispersal of the collection. A team of experts will discuss museum practices, professional and personal experiences and legal issues to provide practical advice applicable to anyone who has wondered
“I have it, I love it, now what do I do with it?” While the general advice will apply to any collection, the focus will be on quilts and other textiles. Experts include DAR Museum Curator of Textiles Alden O’Brien, Costume and Textile specialist and appraiser Newbie Richardson, Quilt collector and historian Debby Cooney, and museum studies graduate Alison Polivka, who recently cataloged a large private collection. “In home” storage techniques, simple inventory methods and legal ramifications of donating, selling, and/or inheriting, along with horror stories of what happened to collections where proper actions were not taken, will be shared.

Analyzing Baltimore Album Quilts
with Virginia Vis

A single Baltimore Album quilt is a thing of beauty, but any single one is better appreciated with knowledge of the characteristics of the entire genre. Building upon her research presented at the Daughters of the American Revolution Museum seminar “Eye Opening: New Research on Early Quilts of Maryland and Virginia”, Virginia Vis will analyze Baltimore Album Quilts. Categories of pattern styles will be identified, similar designs compared, and regional influences on the designs discussed. Along with a summation of previously published scholarship, new information gleaned from the increasing numbers of Baltimore Albums available for study will be described. This Study Center is for the BAQ enthusiast who wants to broaden her understanding of this complex quilt style.

You Can Take a Quilt Out of Pennsylvania But You Can’t Take Pennsylvania Out of the Quilt
with Sue Reich and Barb Garrett

 

The state of Pennsylvania has always been a melting pot where immigrants came in the pursuit of religious freedom and opportunity. This Study Center will take a close look at immigration patterns and migration routes in Pennsylvania and the connection with designs and styles of quiltmaking in the 19th and 20th Century quiltmaking. The Study Center leaders, natives of the Keystone State, Sue Reich from Western Pennsylvania and Barb Garrett from Eastern Pennsylvania, will share their knowledge and experience.

Please bring a 19th or early 20th Century quilt with Pennsylvania origins to share.

Sunday Study Centers

2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
KerrCoxcombCurrantsorg
KerrSouthernQuilts

Southern Quilts: Celebrating Traditions, History, and Design
with Mary Kerr

Closed

The South has a rich quilting history, steeped in tradition and passed down through the generations. Be prepared to share and debate as Mary Kerr presents research on these uniquely Southern patterns compiled by 13 of AQSG’s fabulous historians. We have just scratched the surface with Mary’s new book, Southern Quilts. Together we can identify additional characteristics in our Southern Quilting heritage and encourage further study. Participants are encouraged to bring Southern quilts, tops, and ephemera to share, study, and discuss.

Plush Template Embroidery-History and Hands-on Workshop
with Ann Hermes

Plush template embroidery (also called stump work and tufted wool embroidery) is a method used to create plush designs. It is done by stitching with wool yarn over a template. The yarn is cut in a strategic way to release the template, then trimmed, brushed and sculpted to give stars, hearts, flowers, and other fanciful designs. This embroidery technique was done by women in southeastern Pennsylvania from about 1890-1950 to make decorated bed and lap blankets, pillow covers, and pincushions. It was revitalized in the 1930’s in England with the introduction of the patented “Kay’s Practical Embroiderer.”

Study Center participants will learn the technique by stitching a small plush star with materials provided. Attendees are asked to bring their own small, sharp scissors, 5” embroidery hoop, and needle nose pliers.

Analyzing Baltimore Album Quilts
with Virginia Vis

Closed

A single Baltimore Album quilt is a thing of beauty, but any single one is better appreciated with knowledge of the characteristics of the entire genre. Building upon her research presented at the Daughters of the American Revolution Museum seminar “Eye Opening: New Research on Early Quilts of Maryland and Virginia”, Virginia Vis will analyze Baltimore Album Quilts. Categories of pattern styles will be identified, similar designs compared, and regional influences on the designs discussed. Along with a summation of previously published scholarship, new information gleaned from the increasing numbers of Baltimore Albums available for study will be described. This Study Center is for the BAQ enthusiast who wants to broaden her understanding of this complex quilt style.