Study Centers

Study Centers are Optional Events and are an additional $50 apiece

Thursday

September 10, 2020

Beyond “Remember Me”: How to Study an Inscribed Quilt

with Lorie Chase

Study of an inscribed quilt is a gentle way to begin research. Some of the information you are looking for is inscribed right on the quilt! We will introduce research methods beginning with the who, why, when, and how of a case study. Then we will explore the possibilities of aggregating case studies to document social practices in a broader community context: the “So what?” of research. The group will view inscribed quilts and use an illustrated guide for their study. Participants are welcome to bring an inscribed quilt.

AM I BLUE? Exploring Red and Blue Applique Quilts of the Mid Nineteenth Century.

with Lenna DeMarco

Everyone is familiar with the red and green applique quilts of the mid nineteenth century but there were also many red and blue applique quilts made during the same period. Or are they? Are they really red and blue or could they have originally been red with a green dye that has suffered color loss? The debate is fierce. In this session we will explore not only the fugitive properties of blue and green dyes but also those aesthetic elements that may have influenced a quilt maker in her choice of color. This is a hands on session and members are requested to bring appropriate examples to share and explore.Everyone is familiar with the red and green applique quilts of the mid nineteenth century but there were also many red and blue applique quilts made during the same period. Or are they? Are they really red and blue or could they have originally been red with a green dye that has suffered color loss? The debate is fierce. In this session we will explore not only the fugitive properties of blue and green dyes but also those aesthetic elements that may have influenced a quilt maker in her choice of color. This is a hands on session and members are requested to bring appropriate examples to share and explore.

What’s Your Story: Documenting Quilt Collections

with Jodi Evans

What do quilts, cookies, and potato chips have in common?  It’s hard to stop at just one. Quilters are collectors – fabrics, patterns, books, notions, and the finished quilts all end up in our lives, chosen and beloved.  But, how do you manage all this stuff?  Geared toward private collections, and highlighting a variety of paper and digital options, this workshop will present easy and efficient methods for documenting quilts and other collection items.  Discussion and sharing of ideas is encouraged!

How to Decipher the Mysterious Chemicals Needed to Wet Clean Textiles

with Lynn Lancaster Gorges

Does washing or spot cleaning a quilt or any other treasured textile strike fear in your heart? You ask…. What can I do so that I don’t ruin it? You walk down the aisles of the cleaning section at your grocery store and read every one of those bottles. You are then more confused than ever! You go online and read articles and get even more confused.

 

Unfortunately companies who produce cleaning chemicals are not required to list the ingredients. Or if they do list them, they might list only the very complicated chemical names that don’t help us one bit. Our study center will consist of a power point to demonstrate some of the steps to take when wet cleaning. It will show the many options for cleaning available to us.  Then we will learn about the different types of chemicals and how they react to different stains and to different fibers such as cotton, silk, wool and synthetics. Handouts will be given so that you will go home armed with information that will make wet cleaning or spot cleaning a less frightening experience.

Tulip or Lily? Migration of motif from Pennsylvania to NC

with Neva Hart

19th century quilt makers migrated from Pennsylvania to North Carolina via the Shenandoah Valley. Did the 3-petal Pennsylvania Tulip motif evolve during the journey into the Carolina Lily? Compare 19th century examples of tulip designs on fracturs, textiles, furniture, and pottery as the motif gradually changed on quilts through the century ending over 600 miles away. A short power point presents examples from museums and collectors. Bring examples of tulip motif quilts (preferably mid-Atlantic provenance) or 8x10 color photos to discuss design similarities and development in quilts.

Limit 2 quilts/person.

Southern Quilts; Celebrating Traditions, History and Design

with Mary Kerr

Southern quilts have a distinctive feel that set them apart from other textiles. These quilts reflect a rich quilting history, steeped in tradition, and passed down through the generations. Join Mary Kerr as she shares some of the glorious designs, colors, and patterns that are unique to this region.

Southern Quilts: Celebrating Traditions, History and Design was published in 2018 when Mary collaborated with 13 other AQSG historians to share quilts from 17 Southern institutions and more than 50 private collectors. Since that time additional research has been started and new pieces and patterns continue to be studied.

Bring your Southern quilts and tops to share. There will be a PowerPoint presentation followed by a bed turning.

Proceeds from this project benefit The American Quilt Study Group.                               

 The book may be purchased at www.marywkerr.com.

Charm Quilts – A One-Patch Treasure

with Amy Korn

Charm quilts provide a historical look at popular one-patch quilts with no repeating fabrics popular in the 1880s, 1930s and again in 2000. To study charm quilts is to follow fabric trends, popular colors and prints and to share in the love of fabric. A PowerPoint presentation, examination of many examples from the 3 eras and handouts will be used. Also, in the spirit of a charm quilt fabric swap, please bring 25 4” squares in two different fabrics (total of 50 squares), as well as any charm quilt examples.

The History of the Sewing Machine & its Use in Quilting

with Anita B. Loscalzo

The need for a workable sewing machine found its roots in both home and commercial venues. Inventors developed the first sewing machines for commercial use, but quickly marketed them to the public-at-large in the early 1850s. Women eagerly embraced a technology that would eliminate even a small portion of the drudgery of hand sewing. The history of the sewing machine from the 1830s to the present will be presented, as well as the evolution of machine quilting from its earliest use in the 19th century, to its decline in the early 20th century, and finally to its dominance today. Attendees are encouraged to bring examples of pre-1950 quilts produced or quilted by machine for a sharing session in the second part of the study center. Several antique sewing machines from the Virginia Quilt Museum will be on view as well.

Using Facebook to Further Quilt Studies

with Tara Miller

Join the vibrant quilt study community online! Learn how to use the wealth of resources available in Facebook groups to assist you in quilt- and textile-related studies. We’ll demystify public verses private posts and provide guidance on how to keep your personal information private while actively enjoying the company and hive knowledge of your fellow quilt historians.

Feed Sacks: What We Have Learned

with Marian Ann J. Montgomery, Ph.D.

Quilt historians led the 21st century revival of interest in feed sacks. As a result of research for the book, Cotton and Thrift: Feed Sacks and the Fabric of American Households, and preparation for the exhibit of the same name, Dr. Montgomery has uncovered new information on the subject that she will share in this study center. This presentation will help with the dating of feed sack material and understanding the various stages of the development of feed sacks and their use in quilts, clothing and other household items. Attendees are welcome to bring their own feed sack materials for discussion and Dr. Montgomery will have a few examples to share. Additionally, Disney Alice in Wonderland vintage merchandise expert, Matt Crandall, will share examples and information about how Disney partnered with the Percy Kent Bag Manufacturing Company to print Alice in Wonderland images on cotton sacks around the release of the 1951 version of the Alice in Wonderland movie.

Early American Textiles from Military Fabrics

With Lori Lee Triplett

This study center explores known early American masterpieces using military fabrics or felted wools and/or depicting military images. The textiles included are quilts, bedcovers, wall hangings, and table covers. Details about each masterpiece such as descriptions, techniques used, and provenance are included. The only existing American military pictorial table cover will be displayed for further examination and discussion.

Photography will not be allowed.

Carrying a Quilt Back to Old Virginny

with Claire McKarns

The lovely Neff Quilt is now proudly exhibited in the Virginia Quilt Museum. This was made possible through the efforts of members of the American Quilt Study Group. The study center will discuss the research behind this acquisition and techniques used. Other examples of returning quilts to their place or family of origin may be discussed.

Photography will not be allowed.